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Buying a house with HECS or HELP debt

Buying a house with HECS or HELP debt

 

Paying off your education is no reason to put off buying property.

You can remember it now: sitting in a chair at the back of the lecture theatre, chatting to your friends and ignoring the debt that each day at university was plunging you into.

But now you’re older and wiser, and reality has set in. You want to buy a property, but you’re unsure how your student HECS/HELP debt could impact your ability to take out a loan.

When you apply for a home loan, you’ll need to reveal information about your liabilities, poor credit ratings and any other debts you have. This is where your student debt can affect things.

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Stamp Duty explained

Stamp Duty explained

Stamp duty is a charge which is applied by state governments in Australia  on transactions relating to the transfer of land or property. It is paid upfront and needs to be budgeted for in addition to your loan deposit.

The amount of stamp duty you are required to pay differs in each state, however there are three factors, along with the value of the property, that determine how much stamp duty you will pay. Contributing factors include:

whether or not the property is a primary residence or investment property;whether or not you are a first home buyer; andif you are purchasing an established home, a new home or vacant land.

There are a number of stamp duty calculators available online (including one here on cbmmortgages.com) that take the guesswork out of budgeting for a property. Factoring in this additional cost cannot be overlooked when you are considering your capacity to repay a loan.

However, in a bid by state governments to stimulate home ownership and growth, there are a range of tax concessions available to reduce stamp duty.

Again exact amounts differ across each state, but those who benefit the most are first home buyers and those opting to buy a new home.

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Things to consider before Renovating

Things to consider before Renovating

The decision to renovate is a common sticking point for homeowners, who can spend hours weighing up the cost benefits. 

Whether your motivation is to add value to your property or to add a touch of your personality to the home, renovations are expensive and debt often follows.

By working with a mortgage broker you will be able to find solutions that benefit your long-term goal, rather than hindering future plans.

While CBM Mortgages can’t assist you with forecasts on future property values, we can help you reassess your current financial position, run through your plans and future payments, and decide if you can afford to take on more debt.

Laying the foundations

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Bridging loan or deposit bond?

Bridging loan or deposit bond?

When selling one property and purchasing another, the funds from the sale may not be available in time to use for the purchase deposit. There are typically two options in this scenario: a bridging loan and a deposit bond.

Bridging loan

A bridging loan is a shortterm home loan designed to allow you to initiate the purchase of a property before you have sold your previous one.

Loan terms are often between six and 12 months and bridging loans generally have a higher interest rate than traditional home loans.

This can be a great option but carries some risk. It’s important to know that you will be able to make the repayments even in a worst case scenario where your old house doesn’t sell as quickly as you’d hoped or where property values may change unexpectedly.

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Why property investors need savings

Why property investors need savings

Urgent maintenance is an unavoidable aspect of being a landlord, so having a cash buffer set aside will help you deal with any unexpected problems.

When renting out an investment property, having access to extra cash is vital for two reasons: ● to cover the costs of maintaining the property, giving it the best chance of remaining tenanted; and● to cover the cost of the mortgage should you lose your employment or rental income

“A buffer ensures that you are not stretched to your financial limits, but rather comfortable while on your investment journey,” advises a finance broker.

Ideally, your buffer would sit in an offset account against your mortgage, so that you have immediate access to the money while at the same time reducing the principal, and therefore the total interest payable on, your loan.

“Before calculating a buffer, I ensure my clients have a budget and savings plan in place that identifies their accurate living expenses and ability to save,” the broker says. “I would personally recommend a buffer of three to six months’ worth of loan repayments and living expenses.”

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